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February 28, 2014 at 6:00pm

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Your voice is small but don’t ever stop singing.

— Sarah Kay

February 27, 2014 at 6:00pm

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Always apologize when you’ve done something wrong but don’t you ever apologize for the way your eyes refuse to stop shining.

— Sarah Kay

12:29pm

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Reblogged from luckypeach

(Source: luckypeach, via momofuku)

9:37am

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Baby,” I’ll tell her “remember your mama is a worrier but your papa is a warrior and you are the girl with small hands and big eyes who never stops asking for more.

January 21, 2014 at 11:03pm

5 notes
Reblogged from peridotted

5 Month Meditation →

peridotted:

"What are you doing?", asks my friend colloquially, her exact words being "chu doin?") Right now or with my life, I kid. Of course you jump to the existential interpretation, she jokes. Believe me, I have been asking myself that question my whole life, regardless of my consciousness of it. The…

10:56am

2 notes

The work I did is the work I know, and the work I do is the work I don’t know. That’s why I can’t tell you, I don’t know what I’m doing. And it’s the not knowing that makes it interesting.

— Philip Glass, on the importance of staying uncomfortable

I am constantly faced with this question: “What do you do?” and am constantly trying to construct a nice, clean answer. But what I really want to say is, “I don’t know what the hell I’m doing.” (Not, really true, but you know what I mean.) I’m trying to get better at this, but I have a feeling that if you are expecting a nice, clean answer, then you are asking the wrong person.

January 16, 2014 at 11:29pm

9 notes

I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain.

— John Adams

March 14, 2013 at 8:39am

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Everyone who terrifies you is sixty-five percent water. And everyone you love is made of stardust.

— Finn Butler

February 2, 2013 at 6:23pm

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Reblogged from nikkiatschool

…the loss of the starry skies, accelerated by worldwide population growth in cities, has created an urbanite who “forgets and no longer understands nature.” He adds, “To show him stars is to help him dream again.”

— Thierry Cohen (via nikkiatschool)

January 19, 2013 at 10:50pm

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Reblogged from nikkiatschool

The Amsterdam-based designer says he likes to “visualize [his] fantasies” with his projects, many of which, he thinks, are shared by others.

— http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671645/three-absurd-tools-for-coping-with-waiting-room-misery#7 (via nikkiatschool)

8:20pm

1,446 notes
Reblogged from chriswoebken
slavin:

chriswoebken:


Charles Duke


This was the first photograph I ever bought, a print from the original NASA negative. I looked at it every day for years.
The astronauts on the moon had to contend with quarantine, not just for them, but for their stuff. Nothing could touch the surface, or be exposed to raw atmosphere without extensive decontamination.
Charles Duke brought a photo of his family with him and like everything else they carried, it needed to be isolated from the environment with plastic. It’s hard to say exactly what motivated him to photograph it lying on the surface of the moon, but it’s not that hard to say. If you looked up and saw the earth 250,000 miles away, when you looked back down, you’d want to see something close.
Among the other remarkable aspects of this photo, it made me realize that all the other NASA photos of the moon’s surface were actually color photographs. It was the moon that was monochrome, not their film. 
I always try to picture Duke looking down and seeing his family there, covered in plastic, and wondering whether it made them feel closer, or further away. Of all the photos in the world that address the fragility and vulnerability of human life, this is my favorite. It’s in contrast to the hubris, genius, and accomplishment of considering that vulnerability while dressed in a spacesuit and stomping around on the motherfucking moon.

slavin:

chriswoebken:

Charles Duke

This was the first photograph I ever bought, a print from the original NASA negative. I looked at it every day for years.

The astronauts on the moon had to contend with quarantine, not just for them, but for their stuff. Nothing could touch the surface, or be exposed to raw atmosphere without extensive decontamination.

Charles Duke brought a photo of his family with him and like everything else they carried, it needed to be isolated from the environment with plastic. It’s hard to say exactly what motivated him to photograph it lying on the surface of the moon, but it’s not that hard to say. If you looked up and saw the earth 250,000 miles away, when you looked back down, you’d want to see something close.

Among the other remarkable aspects of this photo, it made me realize that all the other NASA photos of the moon’s surface were actually color photographs. It was the moon that was monochrome, not their film. 

I always try to picture Duke looking down and seeing his family there, covered in plastic, and wondering whether it made them feel closer, or further away. Of all the photos in the world that address the fragility and vulnerability of human life, this is my favorite. It’s in contrast to the hubris, genius, and accomplishment of considering that vulnerability while dressed in a spacesuit and stomping around on the motherfucking moon.

January 17, 2013 at 9:21am

3 notes
Reblogged from nikkiatschool

Looking back, I’ve had a remarkable ride. I’m not sure I can call it a career, because a career implies that I had some kind of career plan, and I never did. The nearest thing I had was a list I made when I was 15 of everything I wanted to do: to write an adult novel, a children’s book, a comic, a movie, record an audiobook, write an episode of Doctor Who… and so on. I didn’t have a career. I just did the next thing on the list.

— Neil Gaiman (via nikkiatschool)

January 13, 2013 at 10:30am

6 notes

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.
For nothing now can ever come to any good.

— W.H. Auden (as seen in Quinn’s post about Aaron)

December 5, 2012 at 12:12pm

2 notes
Reblogged from nikkiatschool

Explaining technical camera things to my 11 yo cousin is like explaining the internet and computers to my seniors.

Me: yeah. the cheapest SLR you'll find is probably around 500.
S: i really want a SLR camera
Me: that's how much i got my most basic one before.
S: what is the diff betweem SLR and DSLR
Me: oh, just use them interchangeably.
S: so no diff?
Me: there is a diff technically. one is digital and the other one is analog.
S: whats analog
Me: like, old. you know, haha
Me: like a film camera.
S: so i think i want the new one.

November 28, 2012 at 12:47pm

4 notes

My whole career has been me trying to find new ways to communicate with people because I desperately want to communicate with people but I don’t want the messy interaction of having to make friends and talk to people, because I probably don’t like ‘em.

— Edmund McMillen in Indie Game: The Movie